Every Eight Minutes, a Girl Disappears in India

A girl is reported missing every eight minutes in India. Approximately 16 million girl children are believed to have been trafficked into the sex trade.
Internationally, the International Labour Organisation (ILO), in a 2014 report says that the world earns $150.2 billion annually just from human trafficking.
This number equates with the combined annual revenues of Google, Ebay and Amazon. In fact, profits from human trafficking have more than tripled over the past 10 years.
The sheer magnitude of these alarming numbers raises some questions – are we really civilised? Could there be a more potent form of savagery?
While the idea of the sale of human beings in the ‘modern’ 21st century is analogous to barbarism, most of us are probably oblivious to the fact that human trafficking is a global issue.
On a dispassionate, pragmatic level, the lure of becoming a trafficker is the potential of colossal earnings in a context of impunity.
In India, the Suppression of Immoral Traffic in Women and Girls Act, 1956 outlaws human trafficking. Changes in 1986 saw the Act being renamed the Immoral Traffic Prevention Act.
The amended Act pertains to trafficking in relation to prostitution, excluding trafficking for other purposes including child labour, organ harvesting and domestic slavery.
But the steady rise in the trafficking of girls bears evidence that this Act has been more cursory than effectual. This lends an urgency to community-based projects to highlight the issue.

What have they done for this?? By they I mean the government. The more they are thinking the more intense the crime is getting. Thinking about those girls I feel ashamed to be a part of the world who cannot assure protection to its citizens. Why isn’t the crime rate getting lower? If it isn’t that means we are not doing enough. We need to work more on it.

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